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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Review)

If you are looking for a thrilling bit of book that sucks you in and takes you in to a world of whimsy and slight oddness, than this book is something you should run away from, stat.

peregrine's

In 2015, my friends bought me this book as a late birthday present. I loved the visual aids and thought it was going to be so good.

I decided I would make it my 2017 first read and I was totally let down. Totally.

I don’t usually bitch and complain about books because I like to acknowledge that it’s a difficult process and well, let’s face it… no one like’s to have any old nobody come and take a giant shit on their hard work and hours of effort…

It started off soooooo good! Jacob’s grandfather is the only surviving member of his family during the holocaust and is sent to stay in a home where he was protected from the Nazi’s. Jacob has a close-knit relationship with his grandfather who told him stories of his peculiar friends from the home. Jacob eats it all up until he is at a coming of age and realises that none of it could possibly be true.

Jacob is a poor little rich boy who has no friends (and I’m not surprised, because he’s a snivelling little shit) and hates his mediocre life even though he obviously has two great parents who love and care for him.

When Jacob’s grandfather starts making gibberish comments and stops answering his phone, Jacob finds him at his house after dark, dying in the scrub behind his house. Jacob sees monsters and his grandfather’s dying words become a riddle which he spends the next 100 or so pages trying to decipher.

Honestly, it was kind of dragging by that stage. I downloaded the audio book to listen to to and from work because its harder to stop ‘reading’ when you’re driving.

All of it turned in to a mess of time travel, time loops, odd children with forced dialogue and odd storylines. (The grandfather’s sweetheart turns in to Jacobs…) he decides to stay in the 1933 time loop and his dad is totally okay with it all. He realises after time that he’s also peculiar and has special powers or some crap…

To be honest, I stopped paying a lot of attention because I was either raging out a Camry driver or I got lost in the excessive plot.

Honestly, the book could have been a thousand times better. The peculiar characters could have been better and I could have felt less underwhelmed as the book came to a close.

My friend told me that perhaps the movie would be better in this case – especially given that it’s a Tim Burton film. Makes sense right?

WRONG!

The movie was so much worse. Jacob was the most emotionless character I’d ever seen. His acting was terrible. Mrs. Peregrine was smug and almost evil. I hated it. I watched about 45 minutes before deciding that it missed so much of the actual detail that without reading the book one would probably be confused.

So, not only was money spent on the hardcopy, but I also had a Kindle version that I read from bed. I also bought the audio companion from Amazon … and then spent $6.99 on the movie rental.

I spent so much money on such a crap book.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children, #1)Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

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2 Comments

  • Reply Bonnie Ferrante

    I didn’t like it either but my 13-year-old granddaughter loved it. She was, however, disappointed with the movie.

    January 14, 2017 at 3:30 am
  • Reply jess

    I was genuinely really irritated by how much it sucked. The worst part about the movie was this allegedly strong bond between grandpa and jacob was really weak. when his grandfather was dying before him he was stoic and awkward. he didnt shed a tear, he didnt flinch, he wasnt in a hurry to get help, he did nothing. it was really odd. And Miss Peregrine was … smug and the smirk she had on her face the entire time made you feel like she was maybe an evil character.

    January 15, 2017 at 8:20 pm
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